FIND US

200 Boulevard du Cami Salié, 64000 Pau, FRANCE

CONTACT US

+33(0)5 59 90 09 74 contact@isbearn.com

John-Mark HANRAHAN

Head of Foundation and Primary School

A VERY WARM WELCOME TO THE EYFS AND PRIMARY SECTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF BEARN.

Our school vision is to create an inspirational, innovative learning environment. Our diverse family is the heart of our international school community, where through teamwork and respect, we strive to become global citizens.

Shortly after joining the ISB in 2007, I remember calling a teacher friend back in the UK and trying to explain the magical school in which I had found myself. The school consisted of around 80 students at the time, and had the feeling of a close-knit family. A family that went on voyages of discovery together, that encouraged each other to succeed, and that seemed to genuinely thrive on the achievements of one another. The best way I could sum it up to people was that it was quite simply, a ‘dream school’: one that encompassed everything that any parent, teacher or child could ask for.

Amazingly, as the school has inevitably grown, it hasn’t lost its family feel, and we are now just a larger family, with the same values at its heart.  Our rich cultural diversity is embraced and celebrated by all and this enables us to nurture our students and develop within them the skills and tools needed to thrive both socially and academically in an international world.

ISB is a place which is very special to everyone who comes here – be it as a child, parent or a member of staff. We are all very proud of our school and of the children’s learning and achievements. We feel that we can offer your child a unique learning experience combining a broad experience of teaching following the English National Curriculum, which we have tailored not only for our unique demographic, but so that we can appreciate and take full advantage of the French culture that surrounds us.

I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to The International School of Bearn and I look forward to meeting you.

John-Mark HANRAHAN

Head of Foundation and Primary School

ENRICHMENT

Education is more than just mastering a subject – it’s also about activities that extend children’s learning through new experiences and opportunities.
In The International School of Bearn Primary School, enriching our curriculum with exciting and innovative opportunities is part of our never-ending quest to Inspire Self Belief. We don’t just want the children to come to school and learn, we want them to foster a love of learning and feel genuinely passionate about the subjects that they study.
As well as the day-to-day taught curriculum, we believe that by offering children rich and creative learning encounters, we provide them with a wealth of opportunity and experiences that will help to shape them.
These experiences may be trips to local areas of interest such as the Chateau-fort de Lourdes, visits from experts such as children’s authors, or even trips further afield, such as to into the Pyrenees mountains, or to the Atlantic coast of Les Landes. Each year we perform Christmas shows, as well as an end of year show, in local theatres. We also sing in local retirement homes and have twice been asked to perform at the switch-on of the Christmas lights, in Pau. We hold annual Science, Maths, PE and French days for the whole school, organised by the primary school Subject Coordinators, and in September 2020, we began our Subject Coordinator’s Enrichment Program. Each term, the coordinators of all subjects will run an ‘Enrichment Workshop’ for a small group of children. These ‘workshops’ give children opportunities to try new and varied activities that may not strictly fit into the curriculum, but that develop character, resilience and motivation, and encourage them to pursue wider goals. Children invited to an enrichment workshop, will go off timetable and work on a special activity with the subject coordinator for an hour, half a day or even a full day in just a small group of children. There are many aims of the workshops, but some of these are:

To boost the confidence of a child in a specific subject.
To stretch and extend more-able pupils in a specific subject.
To give a child a new found love of a subject etc.

 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR CLUBS

After school, we offer an extensive range of extra-curricular activities every night of the week (excluding Wednesdays). These clubs are open to all and offer children regular opportunities to try something new or take part in an activity that they enjoy. Extra-curricular clubs are delivered mostly by teachers and Teaching Assistants from the primary school, as well as by some external clubs and associations.
Our broad range of extra-curricular clubs change on a termly basis and are available for children from the EYFS through to Grade 6. We ensure activities are purposeful, fun and engaging. All of them contribute to and extend children’s learning in school, wellbeing and mental health and holistic development. There are usually around twenty extra-curricular activities to choose from in the primary school.
These extra-curricular clubs include:

  • Art and Crafts
  • Computing
  • Multi-sports
  • Football
  • Cooking
  • Creative Writing
  • Fashion Show
  • Sewing
  • Chess
  • Guitar
  • Yoga
  • Circus
    …And many more

MEET THE TEAM

Head of School / Manager

Maria ELIAS

Head of Foundation Stage AND PRIMARY

John-Mark HANRAHAN

EARLY YEARS 1

Kate Save
Kate Save - Early Years 1 Form Teacher
Suzanne Lewindon
Suzanne Lewindon - Assistant

EARLY YEARS 2

Liz Bailey
Liz Bailey - Early Years 2 FT - Grade 6 Teacher - Head Assistant FS + KS1

RECEPTION

Reema Keswani - Reception Form Teacher
Sabrina Deveaux - Assistant

Grade 1

Michelle Lingard - Grade 1 Form Teacher - SEN Coordinator
Vanessa Azema - Grade 1 Teaching Assistant

GRADE 2

Susie Morton - Grade 2 Form Teacher - Science Coordinator
Elise Perchoux Grade 2 - Teaching Assistant

GRADE 3

Heather Mc Cluskey - Grade 3 Form Teacher - Head Assistant KS2
Sally Keller - Grade 3 T. Assistant

Grade 4

Suzanne Hanrahan - Grade 4 Form Teacher - PE Coordinator
Corine Mariotti - Grade 4 Teaching Assistant

GRADE 5

Judith Walters - Grade 5 Form Teacher - English Coordinator
Jette Buffet - Librarian

GRADE 6

Jessica Nairac - Grade 6 Form Teacher - Maths Coordinator
Michelle Morris - Grades 5/6 T. Assistant

LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

Murielle Bonifacy - French FLM - French Coordinator - Eco-school Representative
Eurydice Lacruz - French FLE
Carole Frederico - English Additionnal Language
Daniel Vie Alvarez de Cienfuegos - French FLE

Art DEPARTMENT

Sara Heath - Art Specialist
Clara Mathern - Music Coordinator - Music & Drama

NON TEACHING STAFF

Jean-Christophe Laplace - IT Architect
Marjorie Morand - School Secretary - Uniform Shop
Marco Morand - Lunch / Security Supervisor
Enya / Nyanya - ISB Mascot

PRIMARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM​

Our innovative Primary School curriculum is based on the National Curriculum for England, and provides pupils with an introduction to the essential knowledge that they need to be educated global citizens. It introduces pupils to the best that has been thought and said; and helps engender an appreciation of human creativity and achievement. We have carefully adapted the curriculum to take advantage of our geographical location, and the rich diversity of our international community.

The national curriculum is just one element in the education of every child. There is time and space in the school day and in each week, term and year to range beyond the national curriculum specifications. Our curriculum provides an outline of core knowledge around which our experienced and highly-skilled teachers develop exciting and stimulating lessons to promote the development of pupils’ knowledge, understanding and skills as part of the wider school curriculum.

In all Grades, lessons are differentiated to ensure that all pupils can access learning, whatever their ability. We stretch and challenge students, within their ability, and give every child the opportunity to achieve their full potential.

We enrich our curriculum with workshops, special events, residentials, field-trips and more, to ensure that our students are given every opportunity to succeed and to nurture a lifelong love of learning!

CORE SUBJECTS
  • English
  • Science
  • Mathematics
  • French
FOUNDATION SUBJECTS
  • Art
  • Music
  • Drama
  • Geography
  • Physical Education
  • History
  • Computing
  • Physical, Social and Health Education (PSHE)

GET THE DETAILED CURRICULUM

Young children naturally engage in play. In keeping with the philosophy of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) curriculum in England, learning and teaching in Early Years at ISB is child centered and ensures play is the foundation of all learning experiences. Children have a mixture of adult led experiences in a whole class or small group setting and regular periods of free play inside and out. We seek to take forward children’s development and learning and meet their individual needs and interests. We foster the characteristics of effective learning as outlined in the EYFS framework: “Engagement” by playing and exploring, “Motivation” through active learning and “thinking” by encouraging them to create and think critically

Staff plan carefully, as a team, to ensure that the learning experiences and the learning environment we provide for your child will stimulate their natural curiosity to ask questions, and find solutions. We endeavor to cater for all learning styles by ensuring children have access to a wide range of sensory materials and technology (such as the interactive whiteboard, digital cameras and iPads) in their daily play sessions. We strive to ensure that children form positive relationships with staff and their peers by being sensitive and responsive to their needs, interests and feelings while also setting clear boundaries, which are consistently upheld by all staff.  

EARLY YEARS FOUNDATION STAGE CURRICULUM

There are seven key areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum (EYFS) which are covered by a number of early learning goals. The seven key areas are:

  • Communication and Language development involves giving children opportunities to experience a rich language environment; to develop their confidence and skills in expressing themselves; and to speak and listen in a range of situations.
  • Physical Development involves providing opportunities for young children to be active and interactive; and to develop their co-ordination, control, and movement. Children must also be helped to understand the importance of physical activity, and to make healthy choices in relation to food. 
  • Personal, Social and Emotional Development involves helping children to develop a positive sense of themselves, and others; to form positive relationships and develop respect for others; to develop social skills and learn how to manage their feelings; to understand appropriate behaviour in groups; and to have confidence in their own abilities.
  • Literacy development involves encouraging children to link sounds and letters and to begin to read and write. Children must be given access to a wide range of reading materials (books, poems, and other written materials) to ignite their interest.
  • Mathematics involves providing children with opportunities to develop and improve their skills in counting, understanding and using numbers, calculating simple addition and subtraction problems; and to describe shapes, spaces, and measures.
  • Understanding the World involves guiding children to make sense of their physical world and their community through opportunities to explore, observe and find out about people, places, technology and the environment.  
  • Expressive Arts and Design involves enabling children to explore and play with a wide range of media and materials, as well as providing opportunities and encouragement for sharing their thoughts, ideas and feelings through a variety of activities in art, music, movement, dance, role-play, and design and technology.

 

MUSIC:

Music is integrated into all curricular areas and utilised daily, however our Music specialist Miss Kate who takes the children for a music session each week. Children are encouraged to listen to a variety of music and also to make their own sounds and rhythms with instruments and with their voices and body parts.

Playing percussion instruments, singing, taking part in movement and dance, are all aimed to develop a sense of pleasure and enjoyment in music.

 

ART AND DESIGN:

As with Music Art and Design is integrated into all curricular areas however the children also have a dedicated Art and Design workshop with our Art specialist Miss Sara once a week. They use a range of materials, tools and resources to represent what they see, hear, touch and feel.

 

 COOKERY:

Cookery is offered on a weekly basis as a group activity during the morning play session.

For further information on the EYFS curriculum, please follow the link below:

EYFS STATUTORY FRAMEWORK

FLE IN KEY STAGE 1

AIMS AND PURPOSES:

Our aim in French, in Key stage 1, is to offer children the opportunity to:

  • Become increasingly familiar with the sounds, and written forms of vocabulary and basic grammar of a modern foreign language;
  • Use their knowledge with growing confidence and competence to understand what they hear and read, and to express themselves in speech and in writing;
  • Use French as a means of communication within the classroom, and outside school;
  • Increase their cultural awareness by learning about French-speaking countries and their peoples, and by working with materials from those countries.

FLE IN KEY STAGE 2

AIMS AND PURPOSES:

Our aim in French, in Key stage 2, is to offer children the opportunity to:

  • Become increasingly familiar with the sounds, and written forms of vocabulary and basic grammar of a modern foreign language;
  • Use their knowledge with growing confidence and competence to understand what they hear and read, and to express themselves in speech and in writing;
  • Use French as a means of communication within the classroom, and outside school; 
  • Develop linguistic competence, extend the knowledge of how language works and explore differences and similarities between the foreign language and English;
  • Develop language skills and language learning skills, including applying knowledge of grammar and structures, so they become increasingly independent learners and users of French;
  • Increase their cultural awareness by learning about French-speaking countries and their peoples, and by working with materials from those countries.

The FLE Department would like to develop learner’s interests, aspirations and attitudes by providing a breadth of experience in using the foreign language(s) in both spoken and written forms in a variety of situations.

CONTENT

Courses are based on the 4 Attainment Targets of the National Curriculum:

  •  Listening
  •  Speaking
  •  Writing 
  •  Reading

The main text books for Grade 5 are “Alex et Zoé” by CLE international. This is further supplemented by other sources which are specifically written around the National Curriculum Framework gathered and compiled by the subject teacher. 

The FLE Department would like to develop learner’s interests, aspirations and attitudes by providing a breadth of experience in using the foreign language(s) in both spoken and written forms in a variety of situations.

Content

Courses are based on the 4 Attainment Targets of the National Curriculum:

  •  Listening
  •  Speaking
  •  Writing 
  •  Reading

The main text book for Grade 2 is Alex et Zoé by CLE international. This is further supplemented by other sources which are specifically written around the National Curriculum Framework gathered and compiled by the subject teacher.  

Grade 1

Grade 1 correspond à la grande section dans le système français qui fait partie du Cycle 1 Cycle des apprentissages premiers : petite section, moyenne section et grande section de l’école maternelle (depuis la rentrée 2014) 

Selon les instructions officielles du Ministère de l’Education Nationale, l’objectif de l’école

maternelle est d’aider chaque enfant à devenir autonome et à s’approprier des connaissances et des compétences. Il doit acquérir un langage oral riche, organisé et compréhensible par l’autre.

Aims and Purposes

Le langage oral étant le pivot des apprentissages, il sera une priorité. Cependant, le système anglais commençant plus tôt l’apprentissage des sons et des lettres (dès Reception, ce qui correspond à la moyenne section), les élèves francophones de Grade 1 commenceront donc l’apprentissage des sons français et donc de la lecture plus tôt que leurs camarades scolarisés dans le système éducatif français.

Content

  • Maîtrise du langage oral

Le langage oral est le pivot des apprentissages. Les enfants apprennent à échanger, à s’exprimer. Une attention particulière est portée à la compréhension de récits lus par l’enseignant.

Le travail sur les sons de la parole, l’acquisition du principe alphabétique et des gestes de l’écriture préparent l’apprentissage  de la lecture et de l’écriture.

Continuer à apprendre à parler la langue française et à la comprendre

Leur environnement quotidien étant l’anglais, il est encore plus important que l’élève arrive à s’exprimer dans sa langue natale et acquiert les bonnes bases de l’expression orale. C’est en recourant donc au dialogue que le maître construit progressivement une meilleure compréhension ou une meilleure expression.

  •     Lecture

L’apprentissage de la lecture commencera par l’utilisation d’une méthode suisse : « La planète des Alphas ». C’est une méthode ludique et efficace, spécialement adaptée à l’imaginaire de l’enfant, et basée sur un conte fantastique dans lequel les héros sont des personnages qui ont la forme des lettres et une raison d’émettre leur son. Par exemple, monsieur o est un personnage tout rond qui adore faire des bulles bien rondes en poussant des oooh! admiratifs. Ou encore, le “f” est une fusée dont le bruit du moteur fait fff. 

 

  •     Ecriture

Activités graphiques 

À l’école maternelle, l’enfant apprend à maîtriser les gestes essentiels de l’écriture. Qu’il soit droitier ou gaucher, il tient normalement son crayon ou son stylo sans crisper la main, il sait placer sa feuille dans le prolongement de son avant-bras, il maîtrise les principaux tracés et respecte les sens de rotation, afin de faciliter la progressive mise en place d’une écriture cursive rapide et lisible. À l’école élémentaire, il doit se doter d’une écriture cursive sûre et lisible. 

 

 

Grade 2

Grade 2 correspond au CP dans le système français. Cette classe débute le Cycle des apprentissages fondamentaux : cours préparatoire (CP), cours élémentaire première année (CE1) et cours élémentaire deuxième année (CE2) de l’école élémentaire.

Aims and Purposes

Les objectifs prioritaires du CP et du CE1 sont : l’apprentissage de la lecture et l’écriture de la langue française

À la fin de la grande section de l’école maternelle, l’élève a largement accru son vocabulaire. Il est capable de s’exprimer, d’écouter et de prendre la parole. Il comprend un récit quand il est lu par un adulte. Il distingue clairement les sonorités de la langue et les signes graphiques qui les représentent à l’écrit.

Au cours préparatoire, l’apprentissage de la lecture passe par le décodage et l’identification des mots, par l’acquisition progressive des connaissances et compétences nécessaires à la compréhension des textes. Les apprentissages de la lecture et de l’écriture, qu’il s’agisse des mots, des phrases, des textes, menés de pair, se renforcent mutuellement tout au long du cycle. Ces apprentissages s’appuient sur la pratique orale du langage et sur l’acquisition du vocabulaire. Ils s’accompagnent d’une première initiation à la grammaire et à l’orthographe.

Content

  • Maîtrise du langage oral

Structurer et augmenter le vocabulaire disponible  

À partir de six ans, les enfants deviennent de plus en plus attentifs aux mots nouveaux qu’ils découvrent dans les discours d’autrui ou à l’occasion des lectures qu’ils écoutent. Dans cette perspective, les discussions sur la compréhension des textes jouent  un rôle essentiel. 

Il ne s’agit pas de s’engager dans une description formelle du lexique mais de jouer avec lui et de développer ainsi le plaisir de la langue.

  •     Lecture

Lire c’est à la fois déchiffrer (maîtriser le code) et comprendre (donner du sens).  

Pour identifier un mot, maîtriser le code, le lecteur utilise la voie directe (un mot est directement associé à sa représentation visuelle) et la voie indirecte (déchiffrage du code alphabétique, syllabique). Chaque élève met en place sa propre stratégie de lecture en utilisant et en combinant les processus.

La méthode « Que d’histoires » de Magnard qui propose un apprentissage de la lecture à travers le parcours d’œuvres complètes et la découverte de différents types d’écrits est le support de cet apprentissage.

 

  • Ecriture               

Production d’écrits

L’élève apprend à copier un texte court sans erreurs en respectant les règles de l’écriture cursive (lignes, mise en page), à écrire sous la dictée des syllabes, des mots puis des phrases, à concevoir et produire un texte court de manière collective puis autonome.

L’objectif du cycle des apprentissages fondamentaux est de conduire tous les élèves à une orthographe phonétique sûre, à la capacité de marquer l’accord entre le sujet et le verbe dans toutes les situations régulières, au contrôle des accords de genre et de nombre dans le groupe nominal (dans la proximité du déterminant). La forme orthographique des mots les plus fréquents, mêmes irréguliers, doit être aussi acquise (c’est particulièrement le cas des mots outils).

 La grammaire sera abordée dans des situations d’écriture et de langage.

 

Activités graphiques  

L’élève doit se doter d’une écriture cursive sûre et lisible et gagner en rapidité. 

 

 

Grade 3

Grade 3 correspond au CE1 dans le système français. Cette classe est au centre du Cycle des apprentissages fondamentaux : cours préparatoire (CP), cours élémentaire première année (CE1) et cours élémentaire deuxième année (CE2) de l’école élémentaire.

C’est aux  deux premières années de l’école élémentaire (cours préparatoire -CP et cours élémentaire 1ère année –CE1) que revient la tâche délicate de transformer une première initiation aux techniques de l’écrit en un apprentissage rigoureux et assuré.

Aims and Purposes

Les objectifs prioritaires du CE1 sont l’apprentissage de la lecture, de l’écriture et de la langue française. Au cours préparatoire, l’apprentissage de la lecture passe par le décodage et l’identification des mots, par l’acquisition progressive des connaissances et compétences nécessaires à la compréhension des textes. Les apprentissages de la lecture et de l’écriture, qu’il s’agisse des mots, des phrases, des textes, menés de pair, se renforcent mutuellement tout au long du cycle (jusqu’en CE1). Ces apprentissages s’appuient sur la pratique orale du langage et sur l’acquisition du vocabulaire. Ils s’accompagnent d’un premier apprentissage de la grammaire et de l’orthographe.

Content

  •     Lire et écrire au CE1

Grâce au manuel « A portée de mots – CE1 » des éditions Nathan, les élèves poursuivent mais également consolident les acquisitions mises en place en GS et au CP (Grades 1 et 2) dans le domaine de la compréhension en reliant très fortement parole, lecture et écriture. 

L’identification des mots est, de plus, inégalement maîtrisée par l’ensemble des élèves de CE1. C’est pour cela que le programme de CE1 propose de revoir les correspondances grapho-phonologiques qui peuvent encore poser des difficultés. L’approche se fait à partir de l’étude d’un son et de ses différentes graphies dans une perspective de production, de l’oral à l’écrit. 

  •     Etude de la langue

Au CE1, il ne s’agit pas d’apprendre à nommer des catégories ou des fonctions ; la question n’est pas non plus de réciter des règles de grammaire ou d’orthographe. L’objectif est de permettre aux élèves de prendre un peu de recul avec la langue qu’ils parlent et lisent afin qu’ils s’interrogent sur la façon dont les mots s’organisent, se combinent et permettent de construire une réalité globale. 

Durant l’année de CE1, les élèves vont :

  • découvrir des formes et des modes d’organisation linguistiques simples ;
  • distinguer le groupe sujet du groupe verbal ;
  • repérer les accords du verbe avec le sujet et les accords au sein du groupe nominal ;
  • distinguer les homophones ;
  • reconnaître et utiliser le présent, le passé et le futur ;
  • reconnaître et utiliser les pronoms de la conjugaison.
  • conjuguer les verbes du 1er groupe, être et avoir.

   

  • Lecture suivie

Grâce à la méthode « Que d’histoires – CE1 » des éditions Magnard, les élèves complèteront leur apprentissage de la langue par le biais de sessions de lecture quotidiennes.

Les activités proposées gravitent autour de cinq textes présentant des qualités sur le plan du récit comme sur celui de l’écriture et des illustrations. 

Les textes choisis permettent d’aborder de très nombreuses compétences de lecture, d’écriture et de maîtrise de la langue orale. La lecture d’un texte est indissociable de moments d’échanges oraux et d’appropriation par l’écriture ; elle est également un excellent support à un travail réflexif sur le fonctionnement de la langue écrite en situation. Les étapes de lecture mêlent donc étroitement les différentes approches de l’écrit.

 

 

Grade 4

Grade 4 correspond au CE2 dans le système français. Cette classe est à la fin du Cycle des apprentissages fondamentaux : cours préparatoire (CP), cours élémentaire première année (CE1) et cours élémentaire deuxième année (CE2) de l’école élémentaire.

Aims and Purposes

Il s’agit de faire accéder tous les élèves à la maîtrise de la langue française, à une expression précise et claire à l’oral comme à l’écrit, relève d’abord de l’enseignement du français. Cela engage aussi toutes les disciplines : les sciences, les mathématiques, l’histoire, la géographie, l’éducation physique et les arts.

 

La progression dans la maîtrise de la langue française se fait selon un programme de lecture et d’écriture, de vocabulaire, de grammaire, et d’orthographe. Un programme de littérature vient soutenir l’autonomie en lecture et en écriture des élèves.

Content

  •     Lire et écrire au CE2

Grâce au manuel « A portée de mots – CE2 » des éditions Nathan, les élèves ont accès à différents types de texte, tout en respectant un équilibre général entre les récits et les autres genres comme la poésie, le texte documentaire ou la bande dessinée. Apprendre à lire des récits est essentiel mais diversifier les compétences de lecture des élèves en les initiant aux spécificités d’autres textes est un autre objectif à poursuivre.

Les propositions d’écriture sont aussi variées que les textes proposés à la lecture. En effet, lecture et production de textes s’appuient mutuellement. Les textes lus servent de points de départ et de ressources pour écrire. En retour, l’appropriation, grâce à l’écriture, des caractéristiques d’un genre (la description par exemple) ou de procédés pour éveiller l’intérêt (présenter des personnages par exemple) rend ensuite le lecteur plus sensible à ces caractéristiques ou ces procédés.

  •     Etude de la langue

Au CE2, la progression grammaticale insistera sur la nature et la fonction des mots dans la phrase, mais en privilégiant le questionnement portant sur le sens de cette phrase. Les élèves apprendront alors à identifier le sujet et le verbe des phrases, le complément d’objet direct, les déterminants, les adjectifs qualificatifs, les compléments du nom et les pronoms personnels.

En orthographe, la passerelle avec le cycle 2 est organisée en revoyant les relations phonographiques les plus importantes. LA chaîne du genre et du nombre sera aussi étudiée.

L’étude des homophones grammaticaux est volontairement dissociée pour éviter d’accroître les confusions (a/à, on/ont..).

En conjugaison, après avoir mis en place la carte d’identité des différents verbes, nous abordons systématiquement les principaux temps de l’indicatif en alternant l’étude de l’usage et de la valeur des temps avec l’analyse formelle de leur conjugaison.

En vocabulaire, en liaison encore avec le cycle 2, nous commençons par un travail simple sur le sens des mots (contraires, synonymes) avant de s’attacher à un travail morphologique plus complexe (composition, dérivation)

  •     Lecture suivie

Les élèves complèteront leur apprentissage de la langue par le biais de sessions de lecture quotidiennes.

Les activités proposées gravitent autour de  textes présentant des qualités sur le plan du récit comme sur celui de l’écriture et des illustrations.  

Les textes choisis permettent d’aborder de très nombreuses compétences de lecture, d’écriture et de maîtrise de la langue orale. La lecture d’un texte est indissociable de moments d’échanges oraux et d’appropriation par l’écriture ; elle est également un excellent support à un travail réflexif sur le fonctionnement de la langue écrite en situation. Des activités d’apprentissage dans le domaine du fonctionnement de la langue (vocabulaire, grammaire, orthographe) sont ainsi proposées en lien avec le travail sur le sens. 

 

Grade 5

Grade 5 correspond au CM1 dans le système français. Elle appartient au Cycle de consolidation :

cours moyen première année (CM1), cours moyen deuxième année (CM2) de l’école élémentaire et classe de sixième des collèges

L’élève continue à acquérir les bases de la maîtrise du langage et de la langue française. Toutefois, il y accède différemment, car il entre dans une phase de son développement psychologique qui lui permet de construire des connaissances de manière plus réfléchie, de s’approprier des instruments intellectuels plus assurés.

Aims and Purposes

L’entrée en cycle 3 va amener l’élève à consolider ses compétences de base mais aussi à accéder à de nouveaux apprentissages : les exigences de longueur et de correction vont s’accroître en matière de production d’écrits, la rencontre avec des textes plus longs, plus difficiles vont l’obliger à affiner sa compréhension et à élargir son univers culturel, les apprentissages réflexifs vont prendre une plus grande place, en liaison avec la lecture et l’écriture.

Le CE2 a marqué le début de ce cheminement vers le collège et de nouvelles compétences. Le CM1 va le poursuivre.

Content

  •    Lire et écrire au CM1

« L’île aux mots – CM1 » des éditions Nathan proposent plusieurs lectures en variant les thématiques, les tons, les genres, les types de texte, tout en respectant un équilibre général entre les récits et les autres genres comme la poésie, le texte documentaire et journalistique ou le théâtre. Les textes deviennent aussi plus longs en avançant dans l’année scolaire, ce qui correspond au développement des compétences des élèves.

Diversifier les compétences de lecture des élèves en les initiant aux spécificités des différents textes est un autre objectif à poursuivre. Cet objectif prend de l’importance au fur et à mesure que l’on s’avance dans le cycle 3, en particulier parce que lire « tous » les textes garantit l’accès autonome aux informations et aux savoirs. 

Les propositions d’écriture sont aussi variées que les textes proposés à la lecture. En effet, lecture et production de textes s’appuient mutuellement. Les textes lus servent de points de départ et de ressources pour écrire. En retour, l’appropriation, grâce à l’écriture, des caractéristiques d’un genre (le monologue dans une pièce de théâtre par exemple) ou de procédés pour éveiller l’intérêt (présenter des personnages pour les faire agir) rend ensuite le lecteur plus sensible à ces caractéristiques ou ces procédés.

  •    Etude de la langue

Au CM1, la progression grammaticale insistera sur les composants du groupe verbal et de la phrase, mais en privilégiant le questionnement portant sur le sens de cette phrase et en passant à l’analyse de la phrase complexe. On distinguera alors trois ensembles principaux, un autour du groupe nominal, un sur les composants du groupe verbal dans la phrase simple et le dernier sur la phrase complexe et les propositions subordonnées.

En orthographe, on étudiera essentiellement la « chaîne du genre et du nombre » dans le groupe nominal d’abord, puis dans toute la phrase. Les trois ensembles principaux sont les accords en genre et en nombre des noms et adjectifs, les accords du verbe avec son sujet et quelques homophones orthographiques.

En conjugaison, il s’agit de consolider le travail fait en CE2, puis de bien mettre en place les différents temps du passé. Les trois ensembles principaux sont donc, le présent de l’indicatif et l’impératif, les temps du passé (imparfait, passé simple, passé composé, plus-que-parfait) 

Enfin en vocabulaire, on commence par un travail simple sur le sens des mots avant de s’attacher à un travail morphologique plus complexe et à l’étude des procédés pour comparer, décrire et exprimer. Le sens et l’origine des mots (autour du dictionnaire), les problèmes morphologiques, préfixes et suffixes et le vocabulaire thématique seront donc les trois ensembles principaux de vocabulaire.

  •    Lecture suivie

 Les élèves complèteront leur apprentissage de la langue par le biais de sessions de lecture quotidiennes. Les activités proposées gravitent autour de textes littéraires. Ces textes relèvent de différents genres, et sont conformes aux dernières instructions mettant l’accent sur l’entrée de la littérature à l’école. Ils permettent d’aborder des genres littéraires très variés : récit contemporain, bande dessinée, recueil de contes, roman policier, pièce de théâtre, récit fantastique. À travers ces œuvres sont abordés des grands thèmes qui touchent les enfants de CM :

l’apprentissage, le pouvoir de l’imagination, l’amitié et la solidarité, la différence, l’engagement et le courage. 

 

Grade 6

Grade 6 correspond au CM2 dans le système français. Elle appartient au Cycle de consolidation :

cours moyen première année (CM1), cours moyen deuxième année (CM2) de l’école élémentaire et classe de sixième des collèges

L’élève continue à acquérir les bases de la maîtrise du langage et de la langue française. Toutefois, il y accède différemment, car il entre dans une phase de son développement psychologique qui lui permet de construire des connaissances de manière plus réfléchie, de s’approprier des instruments intellectuels plus assurés.

Aims and Purposes

L’entrée en cycle 3 va amener l’élève à consolider ses compétences de base mais aussi à accéder à de nouveaux apprentissages : les exigences de longueur et de correction vont s’accroître en matière de production d’écrits, la rencontre avec des textes plus longs, plus difficiles vont l’obliger à affiner sa compréhension et à élargir son univers culturel, les apprentissages réflexifs vont prendre une plus grande place, en liaison avec la lecture et l’écriture.

Le CE2 a marqué le début de ce cheminement vers le collège et de nouvelles compétences. Le CM1 et le CM2 vont le poursuivre.

Content

  •       Lire et écrire au CM1

« L’île aux mots – CM2 » des éditions Nathan proposent plusieurs lectures en variant les thématiques, les tons, les genres, les types de texte, tout en respectant un équilibre général entre les récits et les autres genres comme la poésie, le texte documentaire et journalistique ou le théâtre. Diversifier les compétences de lecture des élèves en les initiant aux spécificités des différents textes est un autre objectif à poursuivre. Cet objectif prend de l’importance au fur et à mesure que l’on s’avance dans le cycle 3, en particulier parce que lire « tous » les textes garantit l’accès autonome aux informations et aux savoirs. 

Les propositions d’écriture sont aussi variées que les textes proposés à la lecture. En effet, lecture et production de textes s’appuient mutuellement. Les textes lus servent de points de départ et de ressources pour écrire. En retour, l’appropriation, grâce à l’écriture, des caractéristiques d’un genre (la fable par exemple) ou de procédés pour éveiller l’intérêt (présenter des personnages pour les faire agir) rend ensuite le lecteur plus sensible à ces caractéristiques ou ces procédés.

  •       Etude de la langue

Au CM2, l’élève se prépare au collège. Au début de la progression en grammaire, l’élève est sensibilisé à la manipulation des phrases nominales et verbales, de phrases simples et complexes construites par juxtaposition ou coordination. Les classes de mots sont abordées à travers les éléments du groupe nominal puis du groupe verbal. Concernant les subordonnées, on s’en tient à leur identification : elles sont observées et manipulées, mais l’explication de la subordination est prévue au collège. 

En orthographe, dans le prolongement du CM1 et en cohérence avec le programme de 6ème, nous étudions la chaîne des accords dans le groupe nominal puis dans toute la phrase. Nous soulignons le principe général du non accord avec le sujet du participe passé employé avec l’auxiliaire avoir. Dans la perspective de la 6ème, nous abordons les cas où le participe passé s’accorde mais l’étude systématique en sera faite au collège. 

En conjugaison, il s’agit d’initier l’élève à l’usage des temps et des modes. On distingue donc trois ensembles principaux : les temps simples et les temps composés, les temps du récit (temps passé) 

En vocabulaire, nous commençons le travail sur les différents sens des mots. Puis nous développons une approche de la composition et de la dérivation des mots.  

 

  •       Lecture suivie

Les élèves complèteront leur apprentissage de la langue par le biais de sessions de lecture quotidiennes. Les activités proposées gravitent autour de textes littéraires de grande qualité, tant sur le plan des thématiques abordées que sur le plan de l’écriture. Ces textes relèvent de différents genres, et sont conformes aux dernières instructions mettant l’accent sur l’entrée de la littérature à l’école. Ils permettent d’aborder des genres littéraires très variés : récit contemporain, bande dessinée, recueil de contes, roman policier, pièce de théâtre, récit fantastique. À travers ces œuvres sont abordés des grands thèmes qui touchent les enfants de CM : l’apprentissage, le pouvoir de l’imagination, l’amitié et la solidarité, la différence, l’engagement et le courage.

 

Pour plus d’informations sur les instructions officielles et les programmes :

http://www.education.gouv.fr

Through our English program we aim to create confident, creative communicators with the language tools they need to succeed in every area of their learning. At ISB we combine an emphasis on reading for pleasure with a focus on grammar and writing skills. In order to achieve this, our Literacy program is under-pinned by four core principles:

  • Varied Whole Class Texts
  • Real Purpose and Audience
  • Talk for Writing
  • Contextualised Grammar

Varied, Whole Class Texts

Carefully chosen books help develop children’s reading skills, their knowledge of the world around them, and build up a store of books to draw on later in life. At ISB we use a range of good quality whole texts covering a range of different genres and styles.

Real Purpose and Audience

When writing is done for a real purpose or audience it takes on real meaning. Some of our units have a performance or publication outcome where the children know they will be sharing their finished work! These can be found in the ‘Live Units’ box below.

Talk for Writing

Talking about language choices has been shown to have a positive impact on children’s writing. Oral rehearsal (saying what you’re going to write before you write it) helps children develop a sense of what a sentence is and, later, to hear what more complex sentences sound like. It helps them hear the difference between the way we talk and the way we write. Throughout our literacy curriculum, children are given many opportunities to discuss their learning and rehearse what they are going to write about before they put pen to paper.

Contextualised Grammar

To become a great writer, children need to understand how great writing is put together. Within our literacy program, grammar teaching is embedded within the texts we read to help our children understand particular grammar features and its possible effect on writing. Our attention to grammar is explicit, clearly explained and linked to meaning and effect.

Reading

Alongside the four main principles, there is a specific focus on the teaching of reading. This consists of two dimensions:

  • Word reading
  • Comprehension (both listening and reading)

At ISB we focus on developing the pupils’ competence in both areas and different kinds of teaching are needed for each.

In Key Stage 1 the children follow a structured phonics program in order to develop the skills in grapheme-phoneme correspondence and blending sounds into words which they then apply to their own reading.

In Key Stage 2 the focus is directed more towards developing vocabulary, breadth and depth of reading in order to create independent, fluent and enthusiastic readers. There is a greater focus on comprehension and learning to justify their views with evidence from the text.

Our reading books are organized into book bands which incorporate a range of fiction, non-fiction and poetry books. The children are assessed and placed on the appropriate colour and then monitored, moving to the next colour band when the class teacher feels they are ready. After the colour band system, children move onto higher levels with the aim of them becoming free readers by the time they get to upper key stage 2.

 

Here at ISB we are committed to helping pupils whose mother tongue is not English to achieve the highest possible standards and to meet their full potential.
We welcome and value the cultural, linguistic and educational experiences that pupils with English as an Additional Language bring to our school.
Our goal is to help EAL pupils to become confident and fluent in speaking, listening, reading and writing in English in order to be able to fulfill their academic potential.
Assessment tasks are undertaken which test a pupil’s proficiency across the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) and allow for a profile of the child’s initial proficiency and progress to be developed. Both the language support teacher and mainstream teacher update assessment profiles throughout each term to give an overview of each child’s progress. Depending on the pupil’s proficiency in English, he or she will avail of one to one/small group lessons with the language support teacher, support in the mainstream classroom from teaching assistants or the language support teacher, or a combination of both.
We encourage and enable parental support in improving children’s attainment.
Working with your child on homework tasks, communicating with the EAL teacher and mainstream teacher, encouraging your child to speak English where possible are all valuable ways to promote your child’s English language proficiency so that he or she can gradually gain access to the curriculum, ultimately achieving the same educational opportunities as English-speaking peers.

Aims

At the ISB we follow the UK National Curriculum for Mathematics. We therefore aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language
  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

Key Stage 1 (Years 1 and 2)

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in key stage 1 is to ensure that pupils develop confidence and mental fluency with whole numbers, counting and place value. This should involve working with numerals, words and the four operations, including with practical resources [for example, concrete objects and measuring tools].

At this stage, pupils should develop their ability to recognise, describe, draw, compare and sort different shapes and use the related vocabulary. Teaching should also involve using a range of measures to describe and compare different quantities such as length, mass, capacity/volume, time and money.

By the end of year 2, pupils should know the number bonds to 20 and be precise in using and understanding place value. An emphasis on practice at this early stage will aid fluency.

Pupils should read and spell mathematical vocabulary, at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Years 3 and 4)

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in lower key stage 2 is to ensure that pupils become increasingly fluent with whole numbers and the four operations, including number facts and the concept of place value. This should ensure that pupils develop efficient written and mental methods and perform calculations accurately with increasingly large whole numbers.

At this stage, pupils should develop their ability to solve a range of problems, including with simple fractions and decimal place value. Teaching should also ensure that pupils draw with increasing accuracy and develop mathematical reasoning so they can analyse shapes and their properties, and confidently describe the relationships between them. It should ensure that they can use measuring instruments with accuracy and make connections between measure and number.

By the end of year 4, pupils should have memorised their multiplication tables up to and including the 12 multiplication table and show precision and fluency in their work.

Pupils should read and spell mathematical vocabulary correctly and confidently, using their growing word reading knowledge and their knowledge of spelling.

Upper Key Stage 2 (Years 5 and 6)

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in upper key stage 2 is to ensurethatpupils extend their understanding of the number system and place value to include larger integers. This should develop the connections that pupils make between multiplication and division with fractions, decimals, percentages and ratio.

At this stage, pupils should develop their ability to solve a wider range of problems, including increasingly complex properties of numbers and arithmetic, and problems demanding efficient written and mental methods of calculation. With this foundation in arithmetic, pupils are introduced to the language of algebra as a means for solving a variety of problems. Teaching in geometry and measures should consolidate and extend knowledge developed in number. Teaching should also ensure that pupils classify shapes with increasingly complex geometric properties and that they learn the vocabulary they need to describe them.

By the end of year 6, pupils should be fluent in written methods for all four operations, including long multiplication and division, and in working with fractions, decimals and percentages.

Pupils should read, spell and pronounce mathematical vocabulary correctly.

Purpose of study

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

Aims

Through our Science teaching at The International School of Bearn we aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future

Scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding

At The International School of Bearn we believe that the pupils should develop a secure understanding of each key block of knowledge and concepts in order to progress to the next stage. Pupils should be able to describe associated processes and key characteristics in common language, but they should also be familiar with, and use, technical terminology accurately and precisely. They should build up an extended specialist vocabulary. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge to their understanding of science, including collecting, presenting and analysing data.

The nature, processes and methods of science

 ‘Working Scientifically’ is embedded within the content of biology, chemistry and physics, focusing on the key features of scientific enquiry, so that pupils learn to use a variety of approaches to answer relevant scientific questions. These types of scientific enquiry should include: observing over time; pattern seeking; identifying, classifying and grouping; comparative and fair testing (controlled investigations); and researching using secondary sources. Pupils should seek answers to questions through collecting, analysing and presenting data. ‘Working Scientifically’ is developed further at key stages 3 and 4, once pupils have built up sufficient understanding of science to engage meaningfully in more sophisticated discussion of experimental design and control.

Spoken language

At The International School of Bearn the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development stretches across the whole curriculum – cognitively, socially and linguistically. The quality and variety of language that pupils hear and speak are key factors in developing their scientific vocabulary and articulating scientific concepts clearly and precisely. We believe the pupils must be assisted in making their thinking clear, both to themselves and others, and that we should ensure that pupils build secure foundations by using discussion to probe and remedy their misconceptions.

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems.

The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content.

Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Aims:

Our curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation.
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.
  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

IPADs:

The primary tool used across the school for computing are IPADs. We then use 2Simple software with their ‘Purple Mash’ scheme of work to fulfill the majority of the computing objectives. Some of the topics that the children will cover are listed below:

Key Stage 1:

Grade 1Grade 2
Online SafetyOnline Safety
CodingCoding
SpreadsheetsSpreadsheets
PictogramsQuestioning
Lego BuildersMaking Music
Grouping and SortingEffective Searching
 Creating Pictures

Key Stage 2:

Grade 3Grade 4Grade 5Grade 6
Online SafetyOnline SafetyOnline SafetyOnline Safety
CodingCodingCodingCoding
SpreadsheetsSpreadsheetsSpreadsheetsSpreadsheets
Touch TypingLogoDatabasesText Adventures
EmailAnimation3-D ModellingQuizzing
Branching DatabasesEffective SearchesGame CreatorNetworks
SimulationsWriting for Different AudiencesConcept MapsUnderstanding Binary

Outside of the Computing lessons, the children use IPADs, and the apps that they learn how to use, to help them during other lessons. Whether it be for research, to draft a piece of writing or simply as a mini whiteboard to solve a quick calculation in maths, the IPAD is an invaluable classroom tool.

Throughout their time in The ISB Primary School, the children are given constant opportunities to put their computing skills into practise. These skills are put to use in all curriculum subjects, as a tool to record and present their work. This could be creating an animation of the water cycle for Science, publishing a newspaper report in English, or creating and editing a video to present research carried out on a History topic.

 

ISB Primary School Curriculum Objectives (In-line with the English National Curriculum):

Key stage 1

Pupils will be taught to:

  • Understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions.
  • Create and debug simple programs.
  • Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs.
  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content.
  • Recognise common uses of information technology beyond school.
  • Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

Key stage 2

Pupils will be taught to:

  • Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.
  • Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.
  • Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs.
  • Understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration.
  • Use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content.
  • Select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.
  • Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

Humanities

For both History and Geography, we follow an adapted version of the English National Curriculum. We enrich our learning with offsite visits and residentials, and take pride in not only learning about well-known historical world events and geographical locations, but also place a large emphasis on finding out about where we currently live; whether that be learning about France’s major landmarks, or the earthquake that destroyed the nearby village of Arette in 1967. We strive to make our Humanities lessons exciting and inspiring and for the children to develop a love of these two important subjects.

 

History

Our high-quality history curriculum helps pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of the past in France and that of the wider world. It aims to inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past and equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

 

Aims and Purposes:

 

Key Stage 1:

In Key Stage 1, History is about the lives and lifestyles of familiar people in the recent past and about famous people and events in the more distant past, including those from French history.

Children will:

  • Learn about familiar and famous people and about events from the recent and more distant past in France and elsewhere;
  • Look for similarities and differences between life today and in the past and use common words associated with the passing of time;
  • Talk and write about what happened and why people acted as they did;
  • Find out about the past using different sources of information and representations.

Key Stage 2:

In Key Stage 2, History is about people and important events and developments from recent and more distant times in the locality, in France and in other parts of the world.

In History, our aim is to develop children’s attainment in five key areas:

  • Chronological understanding.
  • Organisation and communication.
  • Historical enquiry.
  • Historical interpretation.
  • Awareness of events, people and changes in the past.

 

Example Topics

Below are examples of some of the topics that we study in History.
Grade 1: Family Trees
Grade 2: Castles
Grade 3: Ancient Civilisations: The Egyptians
Grade 4: Ancient Civilisations: The Romans
Grade 5: Nelson Mandela and Apartheid
Grade 6: Pau – Then and Now: La Belle Epoque

Geography

We offer a high-quality geography education that aims to inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Through our teaching, we equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

As well as this, we pride ourselves on giving the children the opportunity to fully appreciate the beautiful country that we are living in and throughout both key stages, teach specific topics about France’s human and physical geography, whilst also including studies of its major landmarks and rich culture.

 

Aims and Purposes:

Key Stage 1

Geography teaching offers opportunities to:

  • Stimulate children’s interest in their surroundings and in the variety of human and physical conditions on the Earth’s surface.
  • Foster children’s sense of wonder at the beauty of the world around them.
  • Help children to develop an informed concern about the quality of the environment and the future of the human habitat.
  • Enhance children’s sense of responsibility for the care of the Earth and its people.

 

Key Stage 2

In Geography, we aim to develop children’s:

  • Geographical enquiry skills.
  • Knowledge and understanding of places.
  • Knowledge and understanding of patterns and physical and human processes.
  • Knowledge and understanding of environmental change and sustainable development.

 

Example Topics

Below are examples of some of the topics that we study in Geography.

Grade 1: Pau VS Arette: Comparing two different localities
Journeys and Explorers

Grade 2: Deforestation
Following Directions (Directional language)

Grade 3: FRANCE: Departments, cites and major landmarks
The Seven Wonders of the World

Grade 4: Earthquakes
Flags of the World

Grade 5: Coasts and Erosion
Reading Maps

Grade 6: Volcanoes and Pompeii
Continents, Countries, Oceans and Seas

At the International School of Béarn, Music has formed an important dimension of the Primary school curriculum. Music is a life-enhancing subject and is essential for the children’s development. It plays a key role in the stimulation of creative thinking. The Music Department is developing young minds through exploration, discovery and creativity. The Music lessons are geared towards developing an appreciation for Music through singing and the use of instruments with year-round shows and Assemblies. Music plays a key role in the education of a student and in the life of the school. From Early years to Grade 6, the students get to perform at different times of the year in concerts and shows. Early Years and Reception have their annual Winter Show which they perform every December. They also perform for Theme Day in June. Grade 1 and 2 perform a Winter Show in December which is performed as a musical. Grades 3 to 6 have their annual Musical Breakfast which is set like a concert. In June, they also present an end of the year show in the form of a musical.

KEY STAGE 1

During Key Stage 1, art and design is about developing children’s creativity and imagination through providing art, craft and design activities that relate to children’s own identity and experiences, the natural and made objects and materials with which they are familiar and the locality in which they live. 

Art offers opportunity to:

  • stimulate children’s creativity and imagination by providing visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a unique way of understanding and responding to the world;
  • develop children’s understanding of colour, form, texture, pattern and their ability to use materials and processes to communicate ideas, feelings and meanings;
  • explore with children ideas and meanings in the work of artists, craftspeople and designers, and help them learn about their different roles and about the functions of art, craft and design in their own lives and in different times and cultures;
  • help children to learn how to make thoughtful judgements and aesthetic and practical decisions and become actively involved in shaping environments. 

During the key stage, pupils will be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through: 

  • Exploring and developing ideas.

Pupils: 

a. record from first-hand observation, experience and imagination, and explore ideas 

b. ask and answer questions about the starting points for their work, and develop their ideas

  • Investigating and making art, craft and design.

Pupils: 

a. investigate the possibilities of a range of materials and processes 

b. try out tools and techniques and apply these to materials and processes, including drawing

c. represent observations, ideas and feelings, and design and make images and artefacts. 

  • Evaluating and developing work.

Pupils: 

a. review what they and others have done and say what they think and feel about it

b. identify what they might change in their current work or develop in their future work. 

  • Knowledge and understanding.

Pupils:

a. visual and tactile elements, including colour, pattern and texture, line and tone, shape, form and space

b. materials and processes used in making art, craft and design 

c. differences and similarities in the work of artists, craftspeople and designers in different times and cultures [for example, sculptors, photographers, architects, textile designers]. 

KEY STAGE 2

During Key Stage 2, Art and Design is about developing children’s creativity and imagination by building on their knowledge, skills and understanding of materials and processes through providing more complex activities. Children’s experiences help to develop their understanding of the diverse roles and functions of art and design in the locality and in the wider world.

Content

During the Key Stage, pupils will be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through: 

  • Exploring and developing ideas 

Pupils: 

  1. record from experience and imagination, to select and record from first-hand observation and to explore ideas for different purposes 
  2. question and make thoughtful observations about starting points and select ideas to use in their work
  3. collect visual and other information [for example, images, materials]to help them develop their ideas, including using a sketchbook. 
  • Investigating and making art, craft and design 

Pupils: 

  1. investigate and combine visual and tactile qualities of materials and processes and to match these qualities to the purpose of the work 
  2. apply their experience of materials and processes, including drawing, developing their control of tools and techniques 
  3. use a variety of methods and approaches to communicate observations, ideas and feelings, and to design and make images and artefacts. 
  • Evaluating and developing work 

Pupils: 

  1. compare ideas, methods and approaches in their own and others’ work and say what they think and feel about them 
  2. adapt their work according to their views and describe how they might develop it further. 
  • Knowledge and understanding 

Pupils will be taught about: 

  1. visual and tactile elements, including colour, pattern and texture, line and tone, shape, form and space, and how these elements can be combined and organised for different purposes 
  2. materials and processes used in art, craft and design and how these can be matched to ideas and intentions 
  3. the roles and purposes of artists, craftspeople and designers working in different times and cultures [for example, Western Europe and the wider world].

At the International School of Béarn, the Drama classes encourage the children to share intellectually and emotionally: through a good deal of active and practical work, but also requiring intellectual and academic abilities. It is a supportive environment where children can practice self-expression, touch on issues of relevance to them, and develop imagination and empathy. Drama students also develop key skills such as concentration, confidence and cooperation. These skills feed into the children’s work in all other areas of the curriculum. At ISB, the different productions and assemblies do a great deal to raise the cultural profile of our school.

PSHE education is a school curriculum subject through which pupils develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to keep themselves healthy, safe and prepared for life and work.

At ISB, we believe this to be one of our most important subjects, and one that once again benefits from our diverse school community.

Throughout the primary school, PSHE is taught using the Jigsaw PSHE scheme. This ensures that we are up to date with the best current practise and that the children at ISB really know and value who they are and understand how they relate to other people in this ever-changing world.

Our PSHE curriculum perfectly connects the pieces of Personal, Social and Health Education, emotional literacy, social skills and spiritual development and as well as its values being embedded in everyday life at ISB, it is also taught explicitly in class and in our weekly assemblies.

The Jigsaw Structure

How the big picture fits together

Jigsaw consists of six half-term units of work (Puzzles), each containing six lessons (Pieces) covering each academic year.

Every Piece has two Learning Intentions, one specific to PSHE (including Relationships and Health Education) and the other designed to develop emotional literacy and social skills.

Puzzles are launched with a whole-school assembly containing an original song, with each year group studying the same unit at the same time (at their own level), building sequentially through the school year, facilitating whole-school learning themes.

The various teaching and learning activities are engaging and mindful of different learning styles and the need for differentiation and the Early Years (EYFS) planning is aligned to the National Early Years Framework (England).

Jigsaw’s Units of work (puzzles) are:

  1. Being Me in My World: Includes understanding my place in the class, school and global community as well as devising Learning Charters.
  2. Celebrating Difference: Includes anti-bullying (cyber and homophobic bullying included) and diversity work.
  3. Dreams and Goals: Includes goal-setting, aspirations for yourself and the world and working together.
  4. Healthy Me: Includes drugs and alcohol education, self-esteem and confidence as well as healthy lifestyle choices.
  5. Relationships: Includes understanding friendship, family and other relationships, conflict resolution and communication skills.
  6. Changing Me: This puzzle includes sex and relationships education in the context of coping positively with change. (includes age-appropriate sex education)

At The International School of Bearn our primary aim is for all children to partake in a broad and balanced P.E curriculum, to give them a full sporting experience and to develop not only their important cognitive skills, but also their self-confidence.
Throughout their time at The International School of Bearn the children will be given the opportunity to discover a variety of individual and team sports and to ultimately find at least one sport that they love and will continue into adulthood in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

During key stage 1, children build on their natural enthusiasm for movement, using it to explore and learn about their world. They start to play and work with other children in pairs and small groups. By watching, listening and experimenting with movement and ideas, they develop their skills in movement and their coordination, and enjoy expressing and testing themselves in a variety of situations.
In order to develop these ‘Multi-skills’ the children take part in variety of activities such as team games, tennis, swimming/water-confidence class, gymnastics, dance (e.g. Zumba) and athletics.

During key stage 2, the children build skills needed in order to compete in a number of team and individual sports such as tennis, tag rugby, and netball, learning to defend and attack and ultimately become an effective player of the sports that we practice. They also continue to develop their athletic ability through gymnastics and track and field events.

Finally, every year, all children from year 1 to year 6 are taken to a local swimming center where, over a number of weeks, they will have the opportunity to build their confidence around water and develop the skills needed to be an effective swimmer.

We proudly feel that the curriculum for sport at The International School of Bearn more than fulfills the requirements set by the national curriculum for England.

 

SWIMMING AND WATER SAFETY

All schools must provide swimming instruction either in key stage 1 or key stage 2.
In particular, pupils should be taught to:

  • Swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres
  • Use a range of strokes effectively [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke]
  • Perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations.

Below are the current yearly overviews for key stage 1 and key stage 2 PE:



KEY STAGE 1(NATIONAL CURRICULUM FOR ENGLAND)

Pupils should develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others. They should be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.
Pupils should be taught to:

  • Master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities
  • Participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending
  • Perform dances using simple movement patterns.

KEY STAGE 2 (NATIONAL CURRICULUM FOR ENGLAND)

Pupils should continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, learning how to use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement. They should enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other. They should develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.
Pupils should be taught to:

  • Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination
  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis], and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending
  • Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics]
  • Perform dances using a range of movement patterns
  • Take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team
  • Compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best.